Richard Childress Racing

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November 13, 2013

From the Pit Box - Homestead-Miami Speedway

Marcus Richmond, crew chief of the No. 3 Bass Pro Shops Chevrolet talks set up for Homestead-Miami Speedway

RCR/HHP Photo RCR/HHP Photo

Marcus Richmond embarked on his first full season at Richard Childress Racing in 2012 where began the season as crew chief on the No. 2 Chevrolet with drivers Kevin Harvick and Brendan Gaughan, earning one victory and two pole awards before joining Ty Dillon and the No. 3 Bass Pro Shops Chevrolet team for the second half of the year. Richmond coached Dillon to a fourth-place finish in the driver championship point standings and Sunoco Rookie of the Year honors off of the heels of three pole awards, one win, six top-five and 13 top-10 finishes. So far this season, the duo has collected two wins, one pole award, nine top-five and 12 top-10 finishes.

Q: How do you set the truck up for Homestead-Miami Speedway?
A: “You really want to set the truck up to be free. The truck will get tighter as the run progresses, so you want to make sure you’re free enough for long green-flag runs. Turn four is really important at Homestead (Miami Speedway). You have to be able to get off of four to have a decent lap. If you have trouble on the exit, it’ll kill your whole lap. We’re going to go there and work on the turning aspect during practice. That will help us be there and contend late in the race. We’ll go and try to win us another one.”

Q: How will the track change during the race at Homestead-Miami Speedway?
A: “The track doesn’t really change much. We don’t have to worry about it as much as when we burn off fuel or the front tires wear out. The less fuel and tire wear will cause us to get tighter and tighter the longer the run. I really feel like the track tends to stay the same from the start of the race to the end of the race. However, it does change a lot from practice because we practice in the middle of the day and race at night, but I don’t think we have to really worry about it during the actual race itself.”

Q: What do you think the keys to success will be this weekend?
A:
“I think the biggest key to success at Homestead-Miami Speedway is having a good restart and getting out front. The driver really has to try to safe as much of his front tires as possible for the end of the race. Track position will also be big here, but it’s like that at a lot of tracks we go to. We’ll battle tire fall off, so we need to be able to save our last set of tires for the last 40-50 laps of the race.”

Q: What is your favorite memory of Homestead-Miami Speedway?
A:
“Well, it’s not my favorite memory, but it’s a memory that will always stick out in my mind when we go to Homestead. We were tied for the championship point standings lead coming to the white flag and when we got back around to the checkered flag, we were fourth in the standings. I could have definitely dealt with Ty finishing second in the points or whatever the cards would have dealt us, but fourth was a hard one to swallow after being tied for the lead. Last year was a pretty big disappointment for the team. Ty really got up on the wheel at the end of the race. I feel like we really had a shot at the championship and to be running second and getting your legs knocked out from underneath of you to finish fourth in the standings was a really bad deal.”
 
Q: This is the last race of the 2013 season, what has been your favorite race this year?
A:
“I’d say my favorite memory from this season is Kentucky Speedway. We had a really bad qualifying run. We got too loose during qualifying, and I think we ended up 22nd. When it was close to the end of the race, Ty caught up to Kyle Busch and drove away from him for the lead to go on and win the race. It was awesome to watch. I think that’s my favorite memory of the season.”
 

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